I recently received an e-mail from a salesperson at a company whose product I was test driving. I had a two-week trial period, then converted the account to permanent usage. Two days later, I received an e-mail from someone at the company asking how the trial went. He also asked what it would take to convince me to use their product. At least one person at that company had not gotten the memo that I was already a customer. I generally delete sales e-mails, but this presents an important teaching moment that I felt compelled to share.

I deleted the e-mail and brushed it off as a hiccup in their process, but not everyone does that. In fact, the stakes are higher when consumers already have a standing relationship with an organization, like their bank or credit union, for example. How do you think your customers or members would react if you sent them a letter or e-mail inviting them to take advantage of a product they already have? They might brush it off, or they might:

  1. A) get irritated that you are spending time and money on something irrelevant
  2. B) get offended by your lack of attention to their relationship with you, or
  3. C) question your financial institution’s competency

Following up with your customers or members is a critical piece of your marketing and sales strategy. If you don’t have an onboarding process in place to start communicating with your customers or members aggressively as soon as they join, you are missing an opportunity to catch them while they are really paying attention. It’s almost like the honeymoon phase of a marriage. People are more willing to listen and get excited about a relationship in the early stages.

But poor onboarding is just as bad, if not worse, than no onboarding at all. When someone is establishing a relationship with your financial institution, it’s offensive to them when you don’t know what products and services they use. It tells them you are more interested in the sale than the relationship. It makes them feel like just another customer or member. That is the exact opposite of how you want them to feel.

Don’t let this happen to you. If you have an onboarding process, avoid complacency. Always look for ways to make it as streamlined and non-offensive to your database as possible. If you don’t have an onboarding process, get one. When executed correctly, it becomes an effective relationship-building tool.

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